Freedom of Speech.

February 1, 2011

An expected attempt to shut down the protests. Sudan’s reached its flash point and its bound to erupt any moment.

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Let the dust settle first.

February 1, 2011

Back from my hiatus…Well those of you following the news on the aftermath of the Tunisian uprising should be aware of the influence arab states have amongst each other. The relationships between arab nations are based on love, admiration, envy and jealousy, all subliminally driven by historical experiences of triumphs and sorrows, the likes of which only seen amongst families. The current events in Egypt have provoked a spark of angst among the people of Sudan, with the hope of rapidly following the trend. On 30-Jan-2011 , a couragous but premature attempt to mimic the Egyptian demonstrations was rapidly intercepted and extinguished by Sudanese authorities. Initially, when word of the demonstrations spread through the grapevine I couldn’t help but feel a sense of impatience to lend a hand in a historical attempt to reshape my country’s future. Nevertheless, after contemplating the possible outcomes of an uprising in Sudan’s current situation, my initial vehemence was overtaken by caution, and here’s why:

* The current situation in Sudan is extremely fragile; since the results of the South Sudan referrendum have not yet been officially announced (though the expected results are rather obvious) and the issue of Abyei still lingering.

* The imminent dangers of attacks on the capital city are highly plausible; Khartoum has witnessed two security breaches within the last half decade specifically speaking the 1-Aug.-2005 riots following Dr. John Garang’s death and the 2008 Omdurman/Khartoum attacks. Now with such dangers still lurking in the shadows, a demonstration would provide a ripe environment for a major security breach once again.

* Economic catastrophe; If uprisings of similar intensity to those in Egypt erupt simultaneously in various nations within the same region, this would cripple the regional economy drastically and hinder global economic revival following the 2008 economic crisis.Signs of prelimenary economic setbacks in Egypt is already a cause of concern, for the Sudan to follow in similar actions would be a recipe for the region’s demise.

With these hazards in mind, timing an uprising against the current regime is of the upmost importance. Patience is virtue, and waiting for all the dust to settle from the riots in Egypt would provide us with a model to learn from, not to mention in the case the current Egyptian regime falls could see the Sudanese ruling party short of a pivotal ally weakening its current postion. Sudan lets not forget to look before we leap, we have much more to loose in rushing into matters prematurely.

Salam,

SudanEase.

Link: Article on the 30 Jan. 2011 demonstrations.


Sudan is a Piñata full of Oil

September 1, 2007

It has come to my notice the great resembalance between Sudan’s current condition and a pinata. The whole western world keeps bashing the Sudanese goverment and unwillingly torturing the Sudanese citizens with punishments assumed to be for the goverment. The point is the goverment does’nt seem to feel the heat as much as we the citizens do, as far as they are concerned they still keep cashing in their checks and cash from peace treaty to peace treaty and endless made reasons for them to get their payment…

Recently France and Britain have threatened to impose more punishments upon Sudan( as if we lack any punishments) , the concept of these punishments is to force the people to move and do something about their own goverment, (see the irony in that!). So we keep hoping the solution for this goverment could come from the outside, but all the help they could provide us with is to notice that we are the solution.

The people of Sudan have proven to be the most vexatious population to control when unwilling to cooperate, for example lets look at what happened to General Gordon, Lord Kitchener, General Mohammed Gaafar Nimeiry and the list goes on… We have become concerned too much with insignificant issues that we forget to take a look at the big picture and the conditions we are living in.

We are so concerened with digging our enemy’s graves that we can’t even get out of it now, and after all this time we had been unwillingly digging our own graves. So people wake up and work together to get ourselves out of this hole.

Salam,

SudanEase


A Nation under fire and water.

August 8, 2007

The silence before the storm.

The name is SudanEase, due to my numerous obligations this blog would be updated randomly from time to time. I will try my best to have a regular post per week but I can’t make any promises though.

Well, Sudan has been put in the spot light regarding the Darfur controversy since early 2004 when the issue was first put under the spot light. Since then this nation has been set under international fire triggering a series of political and economical penalties against Sudan in attempt to pressure the Sudanese government into submitting to approve the intervention of UN forces. The Sudanese government’s struggle to forbid the UN forces from interfering with the proclaimed genocide has only placed Sudanese relations with most nations on thin ice, the most recent of which is the neighbouring Chad.

Moving to the present day, this August’s rain season in Sudan this year has turned out to be disastrous to the people of Sudan and the government who have droughted their own resources on several insignificant issues such as the installment of a new currency. With limited resources and standing mostly alone to face this predicament the nation is failing to resist nature at its worst. The government helpless and under heavy criticism were forced to turn a blind eye. Up till now 67,731 houses were wrecked by the rains, of which 31,540 were damaged beyond repair.

People tend to underestimate such matters, let me remind you that the world’s wealthiest nation, USA, required international assistance to cope with the aftermath of hurricane Katrina. There is one question I would like to raise; how long will it take the world to realise how much the people in Sudan are suffering for being the VICTIMS!??